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CK^raNGfoLLEG 



OLD TRADITIONS 




NEWMARKET, ONTARIO 




NEWMARKET, ONTARIO 




A RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL 
FOR BOYS 

RE-OPENING SEPTEMBER 13, 1927 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/pickeringcollegeOOpick 




PICKERING COLLEGE 

MAIN ENTRANCE 



PAGE THREE 





JOSEPH McCULLEY 

HEADMASTER 



PAGE FOUR 



n 





FOREWORD 

ICKERING COLLEGE will re-open on September 13th, 
1927, as a boys 1 residential school. In organisation and 
programme, the school will differ in many respects from 
what it was in other days, but this can be ascribed not to 
any change of purpose, but rather to the changed conditions 
of an increasingly complex civilisation. 

The first aim of Pickering College will be to provide a school where 
a boy may receive a sound cultural education, enabling him to take 
his place as an intelligent member of the community with an appre- 
ciation of those things that make for true greatness in a people. Secondly, 
the school aims to discover the possibilities of each student and train 
him so that, utilising these possibilities, he may be enabled to discover 
in what sphere of productive activity he may render fullest service. 

To carry into effect these ideals, the Board has chosen as head' 
master, Mr. Joseph McCulley, a graduate of the College of Education 
and of University College in the University of Toronto, who has re- 
turned to Canada after successfully completing the honour course in 
Modern History at Oxford University. Mr. McCulley has had a 
valuable experience in work with boys. He was for some time a member 
of the staff of the Toronto Public Schools ; for three years he was assistant 
director of the Toronto Y.M.C.A. Boys 1 Camp in Muskoka, and has 
more recently been associated with Mr. Taylor Statten in his camp 
for boys in Algonquin Park. While at Oxford, Mr. McCulley studied 
the English school system, observing particularly those schools in which 
adaptations were being made in the traditional curriculum. It is the 
opinion of the Board that they have chosen as headmaster a young man 
who is exceptionally well qualified, both personally and academically 
to carry on the work of Pickering College, combining with its former 
traditions such newer methods as have been proven pedagogically sound 
in the schools of Europe and America. 

The following pages of this prospectus will explain how these ideals 
are to be carried into effect. 

ALBERT S. ROGERS, 

Chairman of Board. 

WILLIAM HARRIS, 

Secretary. 



PAGE FIVE 



HISTORICAL OUTLINE 

THE first steps for the establishment of this school were taken at 
'The Friends' ' half'year meeting, held near Newmarket in the 
year 1837- Joseph John Gurney, a brother of Elizabeth Fry, 
was present at that meeting, and largely through his encouragement and 
aid it was decided to establish a Friends' Boarding School near Picton, 
Prince Edward County. In his remarks, in this historic meeting, Gurney 
said that the aim of the school should be to combine a sound cultural 
education with practical activities suitable to this country. 

The school was opened in 1842, and after a continuous corporate 
existence of 30 years it was removed to a more central location at Pick' 
ering, at which place it became widely known for its thorough work 
and homelike resident life. When on the eve of reopening for the winter 
term of 1906, the main building was totally destroyed by fire, it was felt 
that in re-building provision should be made, not only for present needs, 
but also for future growth and development. 

The advisability of securing larger grounds more convenient of 
access, with the advantages of town water supply and fire protection, 
led the Board to decide to select a site in the outskirts of the town of 
Newmarket, not far from the place where the idea of such a school 
first took form. 

On this site the college carried on its activities from 1909 until 
1917, when the buildings were turned over to the government to be 
used as a military hospital. 

During its entire history the college has remained true to the ideal 
expressed by Gurney in 1837, and as the college is once more opened to 
take its share in the important task of educating Canadian youth, it 
is the wish of the Board that in the changed conditions of a different 
age, it shall still express in its programme this centuryold tradition. 

LOCATION 

Pickering College is located in the town of Newmarket, thirty miles 
north of Toronto, and is easy of access either by road, railway, or by 
radial line. 

The buildings are situated on the rising ground at the south-east 
corner of the town, and the grounds consist of about 250 acres com- 



PAGE SIX 



prising a well 'managed farm and ample campus space for all outdoor 
sports. 

BUILDINGS 

The main building is of red brick with white stone trim in the 
Georgian style, the entrance marked by four large Corinthian columns 
breaking the long line of the facade. A new gymnasium is being erected 
immediately at the south of the present building. It will be harmonious 
in style with it, and will front on the playing fields. 

A commodious twO'Story frame building will be equipped as an up- 
to-date shop for the practice of the manual arts. There is also on the 
property a large covered skating-rink. The school farm is in actual 
operation, and is provided with complete and modern equipment. 

EQUIPMENT 

The ground floor of the main building is occupied by four well' 
lighted classrooms and an attractive assembly hall and offices. The 
second and third floors are devoted to libraries, bedrooms, and bath' 
rooms. The boys of the junior school will live in groups of four or 
five in pleasant, airy dormitories. The senior boys will live in comfort' 
ably furnished double rooms. Where boys are engaged in scholarship 
study or other special work, it may be possible to provide them with 
single rooms. 

In the renovation of the building, special attention has been paid to 
the provision of a well-equipped science department removed somewhat 
from the other classrooms. Desks of the most modern design have been 
specially constructed for Chemistry and Physics, and a separate labor- 
atory has been equipped for Biological study. In connection with the 
science department there is a photographic dark room, which will be 
open for the use of all the members of the school. 

Provision has also been made for the fine arts, by setting apart special 
studios for art and music. 

Such alterations have been made in the assembly hall as will provide 
ample facilities for all forms of public expression. This room has been 
decorated by Mr. F. H. Johnston, A.R.C.A., who has executed a series 
of ten panels, illustrative of Canadian life and industry from coast to 
coast. 

An infirmary with private wards and bathrooms, isolated from the 
living quarters, provides quiet and restful surroundings for the treat- 
ment of minor illnesses. 



PAGE SEVEN 



The kitchens and laundry are fitted with all the necessary equipment 
for carrying on effectively the domestic side of the school life. A special 
system of high-pressure water mains is laid throughout the college, pro- 
viding at all times effective fire protection. The building is adequately 
heated throughout by a low-pressure steam system. 

THE STAFF 

In an age in which "freedom from restraint" seems to be the key note, 
many parents are anxiously looking for a school whose ideals are Christian 
and democratic, where there will be adequate supervision of their sons' 
activities and where contact with idealistic and sympathetic masters 
shall insure that boys gain the utmost in character development from 
their time at school. 

In a residential school it is possible for these ideals to be realized, 
and even spare time activities assume a definite educational value. 
The character of the masters is, of course, the matter of prime importance 
if there is to be this sympathetic and helpful comradeship between 
them and the boys in all the school activities. 

The men, who have been engaged as masters, are sincerely interested 
in boys, varied in experience and training, and all well qualified to handle 
the academic work of their particular departments. 

ACADEMIC STAFF 

G. N. T. Widdrington, B.A. (Oxon.), (Honours in History), has 
had four years' teaching experience. He will have charge of the depart- 
ment of Classics and Ancient History. 

E. H. Whittingham, B.Sc. (Honours), (King's College, University 
of London), has already had seven years' teaching experience, five of 
them at a large residential school in England, and two of them in 
Canada. He will have charge of the department of Mathematics 
and Science. 

T. C. Shore, M.A. (Queen's University, Kingston), (Honours in 
Modern Languages), has had three years' varied experience in teaching 
and tutoring university groups. He will have charge of the department 
of Modern Languages and English Literature. 

A. C. Bunce, B.S.A. (University of Saskatchewan), (Governor 
General's Gold Medal), will have charge of the Agricultural work at 
the school, and will teach the Biological Sciences. 



PAGE EIGHT 




PAGE NINE 



R. H. Perry, B.A. (University of Toronto), now engaged in special 
work in Education at the University of Columbia, will have charge of 
the Junior School. 

The Headmaster will direct the teaching of British and Canadian 
History throughout the school. 

DIRECTOR OF CHARACTER EDUCATION 

Mr. Taylor Statten, known throughout Canada as a specialist in 
Boys' Work, has been appointed to the staff as Director of Character 
Education. To this unique position he brings the experience of a life- 
time in character development and inspirational work among boys. 
In a residential school he will have an excellent opportunity to utilize 
his gifts and experience in his personal contacts with individual pupils. 
He will be particularly related to the departments of religious education, 
and vocational guidance, and will be largely responsible for applying the 
tested results of modern educational psychology to the work of Pickering 
College. 

PIANO INSTRUCTION 

Instruction in piano will be given by the wife of one of the resident 
masters, who has her A.T.C.M. degree, and considerable teaching 

experience. 

MANUAL ARTS 

The department of manual arts will be in charge of Mr. J. A. 
Maitland, a practical craftsman, who has had seven years' teaching 
experience in a Canadian residential school. 

MATRON- NURSE 

Supervising the domestic arrangements of the school will be the 
matron-nurse, Miss F. S. Ancient, who has had previous experience in 
work of this character in Canadian boys' schools. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The main course of study for all pupils of the school will be that 
leading up to the Pass and Honour Matriculation examinations of the 
Province of Ontario. The work of the junior school will be so adapted 
as to provide the necessary foundation for this course. Work in the 



PAGE TEN 



language subjects will be begun in the junior school. The French Ian' 
guage will be emphasised in order to develop a real facility in the spoken 
use of that language, which is the mother tongue of over two million 
Canadian people. 

It is recognised that it is impossible for all pupils to proceed at an 
equal rate in all subjects, and for this reason much of the work of the 
school will be conducted by the small group and individual method. 
This system provides greater opportunity for thorough teaching by the 
staff and a fuller appreciation and understanding of the work by the 
pupils. 

Every boy will be given opportunity to pursue, during his course, 
those activities which have for him a spontaneous interest and in which 
he has some degree of natural ability. The work on the farm, the metal' 
working and woodworking shops, and the photographic dark-room 
will be largely of this character. But in every case these activities 
will be correlated with the academic work and will provide a natural 
means of expression for the more abstract ideas of the classroom. 

A careful record will be kept of these activities engaged in by the 
pupils, and it is hoped that a study of these natural tendencies of the 
boys, combined with frequent consultation with the pupil and his 
parents will enable the staff to render effective vocational direction. 

For pupils who intend to go into business or commerce immediately 
on graduation from the school, special instruction will be provided 
in the usages of every day commercial life. 

In connection with this department Professor N. A. MacKenzie, 
associate professor of Law in the University of Toronto, has under- 
taken to direct a special series of classes in commercial and international 
law. Professor MacKenzie was formerly legal adviser to the Inter- 
national Labour Office, Geneva, and his extensive knowledge of the 
League of Nations will be available to all pupils in the school. 

In the presentation of all the work of the school it is aimed to give 
the boy a true picture of the inter-relation of all branches of knowledge, 
and the inter-dependence of all trades and professions in a normal society. 
The methods of instruction adopted are designed to develop in the 
pupils qualities of initiative, self-reliance, resourcefulness, and the 
ability to carry responsibility. 



PAGE ELEVEN 



RELIGIOUS AND MORAL TRAINING 

The school is non-sectarian in character, but it holds that an appre- 
ciation of the great truths of the Christian religion is of the utmost 
importance to the developing boy. The exercises of each day will 
begin with an informal devotional period and on Sundays a school 
service will be held when the students will have the opportunity of 
hearing religious leaders who are acquainted with boy life. Boys will 
attend the morning service of their own church in Newmarket; the 
school service will be held on Sunday evening when the pupils will have 
frequent opportunity of hearing addresses by men who know boys 
and their problems. 

As a part of the school course, regular instruction will be given in 
Biblical history and literature. Opportunity will be taken to meet the 
older boys in informal groups for the discussion of those problems 
which are common to adolescent boys. 

ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The location of the school and its equipment provide ample oppor- 
tunity for both outdoor and indoor sport and all the regular games 
will be encouraged. Every boy will receive a thorough physical ex- 
amination at the beginning of each term and, (unless physically unable 
to do so), will be required to take part regularly in some outdoor sport. 




VIEW OF FARM PROPERTY 



PAGE TWELVE 



The school regards team games as a means and not an end, and while 
there will be competition with outside teams, the aim of this depart' 
ment will be to teach every boy in the school how best to keep his body 
fit for the business of life. Boys not naturally athletic will be given 
every encouragement to take part in games and to learn those valuable 
lessons of self-control and co-operation, which are the natural result of 
healthy participation in sport. Where it is necessary, remedial gym- 
nastics will be prescribed by the examining physician and conducted 
under the direction of the staff. 

Boys should be provided with the necessary equipment for those 
sports in which they desire to participate. The athletic activities will 
include rugby, association football, (junior boys), lacrosse, basket-ball, 
indoor baseball, track, hockey, skiing, tobogganing, snow-shoeing, hiking. 

USE OF THE FARM 

All the boys in the school will be encouraged to acquaint themselves 
with, and participate in, the work of the farm, and where individual 
boys desire it, garden plots will be put aside for them to cultivate. 
In correlating the farm with the school activities, the aim is (1) to develop 
a sense of the dignity of labour and to acquire that physical and character 
development that comes from a knowledge of the out-of-doors and 
natural phenomena ; (2) to develop a sympathetic attitude to the agri- 
cultural element in our country, and to give a vision of the opportunities 
for social and civic service in rural communities. 

MANUAL ARTS 

The crafts shop will be equipped for wood-working, metal-working 
and printing. There is no doubt that many boys, when given oppor- 
tunity, will discover in manual work of some kind, their real sphere of 
usefulness, but the college does not undertake to give a technical school 
training. The aim is rather to give an all-round training in muscular 
skill and co-ordination and to give to men, who will be leaders, a many- 
sided practical training that will enable them to understand better the 
tasks set for their fellows and to give wise and efficient leadership in 
their particular spheres. 

MEDICAL ATTENTION 

At the beginning of each term every boy will receive a thorough 
medical examination, and the resident masters will report daily on the 
health of the boys in their charge. Minor ailments will receive the 



PAGE THIRTEEN 



immediate attention of the college physician on his daily visit to the 
school. There is no extra charge for such ordinary medical attention. 

FEES 

The annual fee for resident pupils is $600.00. This fee covers all 
regular tuition expenses, board and lodging and personal laundry. It 
is payable in three equal instalments, in advance of the opening of school 
for the Autumn, Winter and Spring Terms. 

Instruction in music is by special arrangement and is an extra charge. 

All text-books and stationery are available at the school at regular 
prices. 

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION 

A circular has been prepared giving details of clothes required, 
pocket money, etc. This will be forwarded to any parent on request. 

CALENDAR FOR 1927-28 

Tuesday, September 13th, 1927, 9 a.m. — Autumn Term commences. 

Wednesday, December 21st — Autumn Term ends. 

Thursday, January 5th, 1928, 9 a.m. — Winter Term commences. 

Saturday, March 31st — Winter Term ends. 

Wednesday, April 11th, 9 a.m. — Spring Term commences. 

Thursday, June 14th — Spring Term ends. 




L 



MAIN COLLEGE BUILDING 



PAGE FOURTEEN 



THE COLLEGE STAFF 



JOSEPH McCULLEY, B.A., Headmaster 
British and Canadian History 

TAYLOR STATTEN, Esq., Director of Character Education 



G. N. T. WIDDRINGTON, B.A. 

Classics and Ancient History. 



E. H. WHITTINGHAM, B.Sc. 

Mathematics and Science. 



T. C. SHORE, M.A. 

English and Modern Languages. 



A. C. BUNCE, B.S.A. 

Agriculture and Biology. 



R. H. PERRY, B.A. 

Junior School. 



n. a. Mackenzie, b.a., ll.b. 

Special Instructor. 



J. A. MAITLAND, Esq. 
Director of Manual Arts. 

MISS F. S. ANCIENT 
Matron'Nurse. 

Dr. W. P. FIRTH 

WHO WAS PRINCIPAL OF THE SCHOOL FROM 1892 TO 1917 IS MAINTAINING HIS ACTIVE 
ASSOCIATION WITH THE COLLEGE AS PRINCIPAL EMERITUS. 



BOARD OF MANAGEMENT 



ALBERT S. RCGERS, President 



DAVID P. ROGERS, Vice-President. 
SAMUEL ROGERS, Treasurer. 
WM. PAKENHAM, B.A., LL.D. 
WALTER D GREGORY Esq. 



WILLIAM HARRIS, Secretary. 
WM. P. FIRTH, M.A., D.Sc 
PROF. A.G. DORLAND Ph.D. 
ESLI TERRILL, Esq. 



PAGE FIFTEEN